Tag Archives: LCD

SID 2016 Monday Seminar: from mainstream to emerging display

May 25, 2016

SID 2016 DisplayWeek is held in San Francisco, California this week. I taught a seminar on Monday morning, titled “Display Market Forecast –LCD, OLED, e-paper and touch, from main stream to emerging display”.

I’m honored to have been teaching Monday Seminar for 3 years at SID DisplayWeek. According to the conference organizer, there are over 600 attendees for the Monday seminar this year, which is a record high in SID history.

During the 90-min seminar, I first listed the hot trends in display industry in 2016 and 2017. Then I provided the global display industry market forecast to 2026. The overall display industry growth is slowing down but there are hot trends in many areas. Then I discuss the new opportunities in display market:  quantum dot display, flexible and curved LCD display, high resolution, OLED display, e-paper display, embedded touch screen, active pen and touchless human-machine-interaction sensors.

Figure: Dr. Colegrove taught Monday Seminar at SID 2016 DisplayWeek.

Jenny SID 2016 seminar close on leftJenny SID 2016 seminar

Photo credit: Jinzenji-san at Japan Display Inc.

More and more people joined the seminar, many of them had to stand for the one and half an hour seminar. From the questions the attendee asked at the Q&A session, I believe many people are interested in 3 areas: quantum dot, flexible display, touch screen.

More analysis can be found in the “Quantum dot 2016 report”, “Flexible, curved and foldable display report”, Touch and Emerging Display monthly report, June 2016 issue.

For those audiences who has given me your name cards, I’ll send you one monthly report– “Touch and Emerging Display report”– for free next week.

Thanks for reading,

Dr. Jennifer Colegrove and team

2015 FLEX conference review

February 27, 2015

I just came back from the 2015 FLEX conference in Monterey California. There were about 600 attendees this year, a little more than last year. It was great to meet some of you in person.

At 2015 FLEX conference, Professor HK Chung from Sungkyunkwan University in Korea gave a keynote presentation titled “Plastic Revolution”.

Professor Chung first introduced the history of flexible AMOLED and his work at Samsung when he was the VP there.  Then he discussed the challenges of flexible OLED. He indicated, “I used to say LCD is a dumb display. Now I had to say LCD is very smart, you only need to change the backlight, add quantum dot to get vivid pictures, you don’t need to change much in the front plane.”

Figure. SKK University Professor HK Chung giving presentation

HK Chung

Photo by: Jennifer Colegrove, Feb 2015.

At 2015 FLEX conference, on behalf of Touch Display Research, I gave a presentation titled “Touchless bio sensor technologies and market forecast”. I discussed the market of gesture control, voice command, eye tracking, proximity touch and human motion sensors.

Figure. Touch Display Research Dr. Colegrove giving presentation

Jenny 2015 flex

Photo by: Ms. Stoeva, Brewer Science, Feb 2015.

Sensors and wearables are hot topics at this year’s FLEX conference.  More reviews can be found in the Touch and Emerging Display monthly report, February issue and March issue.

Thanks for reading,

Jennifer and team

Curved 105-inch displays at CES are LCDs (not OLED)

March 31, 2014

In the weekend, I read a famous consumer electronic publisher’s article about the 105-inch curved display at CES; it indicated they are curved OLED screen:

Figure: Image of the publisher’s statement about 105-inch curved display

CEA wrong about 105 curved OLED deco

Source: a famous consumer electronic publisher

That statement is wrong. Both LG and Samsung showed several curved display at CES 2014, but the 105-inch curved displays are LCDs, not OLED.  The largest curved OLED demonstrated is 77-inch so far (not count the type that tile many OLED displays together). It’s a bit of heartbreak to see that this famous consumer electronic publisher spread the wrong information.

As I wrote in our mission: I’m concerned about these people and the people they advise. I feel as a Ph.D. and experienced technology analyst, I have the responsibility to provide to my clients correct knowledge, up-to-date information, forward-thinking analysis, and best business strategies.

Touch Display Research has published CES 2014 analysis report in January, it provided detail analysis of all the curved LCDs and curved AMOLED.  

Taiwan touch manufacturers grasp new opportunities

August 8, 2013

(Editor’s note: Dr. Jennifer Colegrove will be traveling to Taipei, Taiwan later this month to speak at the International Display Manufacturing Conference (IDMC) and to visit TouchTaiwan 2013.)

“I am honored to be delivering a special forum at the conference, and eager to meet Taiwan’s touch screen manufacturers and emerging display manufacturers,” said Dr. Colegrove.

Jennifer will be speaking on August 28th, 13:20-13:45 at a special forum of the IDMC conference which is in conjunction with TouchTaiwan exhibition. Contact her by email: jc@touchdisplayresearch.com

 IDMC touchtaiwan

Blog:

Taiwan is one of the most active regions in touch screen manufacturing. In 2006-2007, Apple’s iPhone brought revolutionary changes to the touch screen industry. Touch panel companies at the forefront such as TPK, Wintek, Youngfast, J-Touch rode the wave and grew rapidly.

Recently, display and touch screen integration have become necessary to reduce cost, weight, and thickness. This has led display manufacturers such as AUO, Innolux (used to be named ChiMei Innolux), and CPT to grasp an opportunity and supply the new devices.

In 2013 a wave of new opportunities and challenges are approaching. Touch Display Research analyzed the growth opportunities in:

  1. Large smart phone (>5”)
  2. Touch technology for notebook and all-in-one PCs
  3. ITO-replacement materials
  4. Multi-touch and simultaneous pen writing
  5. Touchless control

I am honored to be delivering a special forum at the conference and eager to meet Taiwan’s touch screen and display manufacturers.

Jennifer and team

Our Mission at Touch Display Research

July 11, 2013

Our mission is to provide accurate industry knowledge, up-to-date information, forward-thinking analysis and the best business strategy recommendations to our clients.

Jenny sit

At SID 2013 I visited LG Display’s exhibition booth and asked the booth attendants about their flexible AMOLED. Another visitor happened to be standing there looking at the flexible AMOLED too. I asked the LG booth attendants, “Does this flexible display use the color filter method?”

The LG booth people answered, “No, this demo doesn’t use a color filter.”

I nodded. At this point, the other visitor jumped in and said, “OLED doesn’t need a color filter, it’s not LCD.”   The visitor looked like an intelligent young man, but only knew part of the technology. I explained to him, “Some OLEDs use a color filter––LG’s OLED TV uses white OLED plus a color filter.” 

The young visitor looked at me with doubt, “Really? I don’t think so.” Then he started to talk to the LG booth people, “I saw your CEO gave a keynote two days ago.” The LG booth people asked, “Where?”

The young visitor said, “The keynote at the beginning of this SID.”

I came to SID 2013 on Tuesday afternoon and missed the keynote talk that morning, but I knew the keynote speaker had been Samsung Display’s CEO, not LG’s CEO. I said, “That was Samsung’s.”  The LG booth people also said, “Our CEO didn’t come this time. Maybe it was Samsung’s.”

But the young visitor didn’t hear me, and kept chatting with the LG booth people.

I walked away with a bit of heartbreak and sympathy for the young visitor.

I recently saw presentation slides from a university professor. In one slide he indicated IGZO TFT was still in R&D stage. I looked at the presentation time––March 2013. I know that Sharp announced the mass production of IGZO TFT in April 2011, and finally mass produced it in April 2012. I met Sharp’s CTO in April 2012. Obviously, that professor had out-dated information and hadn’t followed Sharp’s progress in IGZO.

There are many people like that young visitor and the professor who only know part of the technology, part of the story, and unfortunately provide wrong opinions. They don’t know that AMOLED can have color filter too, they can’t tell Samsung from LG, they don’t know that Sharp has already mass-produced IGZO since 2012, but they are willing to spread wrong information.   

I’m concerned about these people and the people they advise. I feel as a Ph.D. and experienced technology analyst, I have the responsibility to provide to my clients correct knowledge, up-to-date information, forward-thinking analysis, and best business strategies.

LG and Samsung drop lawsuits; Samsung may adopt LG’s OLED technology

 

Feb 21, 2013

On Feb 20th, Korea Times reported that LG Display has dropped its injunction against Samsung Display Corporation.

Samsung and LG have had a fierce competition for decades. Recently the Korean government has become involved and ordered the two companies to talk to each other. Several weeks ago, Samsung dropped its lawsuit against LG Display over OLED technology. Yesterday, LG Display dropped its lawsuit against Samsung over IPS LCD technology.

The announcement comes after Samsung surprisingly decided to adopt LG’s white OLED plus color filter technology. According to Samsung officials the company will start the manufacture of AMOLED with white OLED plus color filter technology in late 2013.

I believe this cooperation is mainly caused by progress by other regions in AMOLED. See our “Large AMOLED TV Summary and Comparison” of LG, Samsung, Sony, AUO, and Panasonic.

Figure. Large AMOLED TV Summary and Comparison

oled tv tablet with cr

Source: Touch Display Research, Touch and Emerging Display Monthly Report, Jan. 2013

In January 2013, LG Electronics officially launched the 55” OLED TV with 1080p resolution in the South Korean market, priced at about $10,000. LG later announced that it would bring the OLED TV to the U.S. market in March 2013, priced at $12,000.

On the other hand, Samsung has no follow-up of when to bring its 55” OLED TV to the market yet.

LG’s 55” OLED TV uses white OLED plus RGBW color filter method for the color patterning, and using oxide TFT for the backplane. Samsung’s 55” OLED TV demo uses RGB chemical vapor deposition and LTPS TFT for the backplane. Current commercialization situation confirmed that LG’s method is more achievable, or can achieve higher yield and lower cost in 2013.

Sony, AUO, and Panasonic brought OLED TVs to a higher level: Ultra HD (4K) resolution. Samsung and LG’s OLED TV stayed at FHD (1080p), but they made them curved this year.

With the other region’s AMOLED competition, it’s a good decision for LG and Samsung to cooperate. Will Samsung adopt white OLED method to only TV or to other size AMOLED?  What is the pros and cons of white OLED method? Will Samsung abandon (bottle up) its other color patterning technologies? More analysis can be found in our Touch and Emerging Display monthly report.

Thanks for reading,

Jennifer and team